Course Announcement: Principles & Techniques of Electrofishing

Opportunity knocks! The National Conservation Training Center (U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service) is offering an electrofishing course in Fort Collins, Colorado during October 17 – 21, 2016.  Please see course description, course flier, and registration process below.

Course Description

Often electrofishing sampling is unsatisfactory (low effectiveness, high variance) due to reasons that include equipment limitations, insufficient understanding of equipment function, inadequate electrode design, and a lack of guidance regarding proper settings given prevailing water conditions and target species.  This class addresses these factors and builds skills in participants that will enable them to tackle sampling issues and increase the efficiency and standardization of electrofishing.

In addition, participants learn how to evaluate gear performance and select suitable equipment, trouble-shoot equipment, assess likelihood of fish injury and use approaches to minimize the potential for stress and injury, and provide a safer operating environment for their crews.

This course covers all types of electrofishing gear types including boats, rafts, tow-barges, shore-based, backpack, electric seine, and pre-positioned.

Participants are encouraged to bring their equipment for evaluation which includes analysis of outputs, calibration check, electrode design, and a safety workup. Gear also is used for standardization exercises.

Course Flier:

electrofishing-training-announcement-colorado-october_17_2016

Registration process for non-Department of Interior Biologists:

doi-learn-request-account-and-register-for-class-electrofishing

Course Announcement: Backpack Electrofishing Fundamentals

A new backpack electrofishing course is launched for Alberta, Canada by NAIT.

5137 Electrofishing Info Sheet[2]

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Power Transfer Theory of Electrofishing, in a Nutshell

Fisheries biologists have known for a long time that many factors affect fishing success. The most important environmental factor is the conductivity of the water, i.e. its ability to conduct an electrical current due to the concentration of ions in the water. Water conductivity has been used as independent variables in multiple regression equations or as covariates to estimate catch per unit effort or some measure of capture efficiency. For decades, biologists made equipment adjustments to compensate for varying water conductivity in an ad hoc fashion without a guiding principle.

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Procedures for Lab Experiments in Tanks

Alan Temple wrote a blog, Setting Doses for Lab Experiments, which I followed with Setup for Lab Experiments in Tanks. That was followed by a short one, Size Matters, on the effect of fish size on the threshold voltage gradient and power density for immobilization or other responses. This blog discusses some aspects of how a tank study is conducted. Specifically mentioned are the fish themselves, the desired response to be assessed, how that response is to be evaluated, and two primary approaches for quantifying the results.

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Size Matters

Yes, size matters…and that includes fish size when electrofishing. Large fish are immobilized with less field intensity or power density than are small fish.  Large fish sustain a higher total dose of electrical energy than do small fish; this is sometimes referred to as whole body voltage. An excellent paper on this topic is Dolan, C.R. and L.E. Miranda. 2003. Immobilization thresholds of electrofishing relative to fish size. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 132:969-976. This short blog provides results of a simple study with various sizes of alligator gar.

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Setup for Lab Experiments in Tanks

Dr. Alan Temple posted a blog on December 9, 2015 entitled “Setting Doses for Lab Experiments.” He suggested that I submit a blog on other aspects of lab studies in tanks. This blog covers the setup of tank studies for electrofishing research, and I plan to submit a companion blog on procedures for tank studies. Important aspects to consider for lab studies are the test tank, the electrodes, the power supply and the electrical field.

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NWETC BACKPACK COURSE, ALASKA, JUNE 2016

Course Title: Backpack Electrofishing: Principles and Practices
Course ID: BIO 407
Status: OPEN
Date(s): June 7, 2016: 8:30am – 4:30pm
June 8, 2016: 8:30am – 4:30pm
June 9, 2016: 8:30am – 4:30pm
Location: William Jack Hernandez Sport Fish Hatchery
N Reeve Blvd
Anchorage, AK
Instructor: Dr. James B. Reynolds
Tuition: $945 / $895*
$845 / $795* (Before May 7, 2016)

Find out more.

NWETC BOAT TRAINING COURSE, CALIFORNIA, MAY 2016

Course Title: Boat Electrofishing: Principles and Practices
Course ID: BIO-408
Status: OPEN
Date(s): May 10, 2016: 8:30am – 4:30pm
May 11, 2016: 8:30am – 4:30pm
May 12, 2016: 8:30am – 4:30pm
Location: Red Lion Inn
1830 Hilltop Dr,
Redding, CA
Instructor: Dr. James B. Reynolds
Tuition: $995 / $945*
$895 / $845* (Before April 9, 2016)

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Ambient or specific conductivity?

Of all the environmental variables which affect electrofishing success, the one for which the most is known, and indeed it has been said is the most important, is water conductivity. This article explores the how and why of conductivity in electrofishing.
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Free safety presentation

This PowerPoint file contains the information you need to electrofish safely. It is the very first step in starting electrofishing. Developed by Alan Temple, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

Download the file.

 

 

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© 2015 Thread One Page. Imagery: Tom Rayner, Alan temple, Richard Pearson, Paul Godfrey, Roger Scott, John Rayner.